Indie Gem: Inland Empire

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Los Angeles is separated from the desert by a region called Inland Empire. Not coincidentally, David Lynch is separated from reality by the very same thing. In his twisty, real-unreal film of the same name, Lynch contemplates the landscape of Woman, contemplates the inland empire of the individual unconscious, and reveals (or obscures, depending on your susceptibility to headaches) the psychological terrain of filmmaking. It’s a maze, and the walls are as tall as trees.

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He’d Kill Us If He Got the Chance: The Conversation

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It opens with silence, only…not. There’s something reverberating. A human voice? The scurrying feet of a ladybug, amplified 9,000 times? Unsettling. “This is a world of hidden mics and two-way mirrors.” We meet the main character. The bugger. And even though this Conversation is dated, it isn’t: the bugger has been replaced by bots, spiders, and Total Information Awareness. Lipstick cameras, pinhole Continue reading “He’d Kill Us If He Got the Chance: The Conversation”

Cult Fave: Detroit 9000

Alex Rocco is one of those guys. His career stretches all the way back to the late 1960s and a bit part on “Batman,” and he’s appeared in a clutch of classic shows since then, from “Kojak” and “The Rockford Files” in the 1970s to “Matt Houston,” “Simon & Simon,”

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Alex Rocco is one of those guys. His career stretches all the way back to the late 1960s and a bit part on “Batman,” and he’s appeared in a clutch of classic shows since then, from “Kojak” and “The Rockford Files” in the 1970s to “Matt Houston,” “Simon & Simon,” and the “Facts of Life” in the 80s, and the bearded justice of “Walker, Texas Ranger” in the 90s. Rocco’s weary eyes, enormous brows, and expressive, craggy face has allowed him to play a succession of cops, villains, and wise men in pool halls, and in 1973’s Detroit 9000, he puts every Continue reading “Cult Fave: Detroit 9000”